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How to find Andromeda and Pegasus using the Cassiopeia constellation

Some constellations that you need to learn only once and discover for the rest of your life. Others are harder to find and you may need some help to understand…
Alexandr Yurtchenko/Alamy

Some constellations that you need to learn only once and discover for the rest of your life. Others are harder to find and you may need some help to understand what they are. This week, we’ll use an example of a previous species (medium but unique Cassiopeia) as a starting point for further research.

Cassiopeia is a constellation in the Northern Hemisphere, but it can also be seen from 20 degrees south latitude in the northern part of the Southern Hemisphere during this period. It is located near Polaris, also known as the North Star, which can be seen all year round from the Northern Hemisphere.

Cassiopeia contains five bright W-shaped or M-shaped stars, depending on where you are looking. Of the two vertical or inverted Vs that make up the constellation, one is much deeper than the inverted V. A good place to find Cassiopeia is to head north anytime, anywhere. The constellations will not be far away.

Cassiopeia is a great constellation, but what’s great about it is that it basically consists of three arrows that connect to other objects in the sky.

First, take a look at Andromeda and Pegasus. To find them, use the three stars in the deeper part of the two Cassiopeia pairs. If Cassiopeia looks like an M to you, it’s on the left, and if it looks like a W, it’s on the right.

If you follow the fictitious line from point V, the bright star line becomes Andromeda. Between Cassiopeia and the first bright star is the Andromeda Galaxy. The Andromeda Galaxy is the closest galaxy to us and can be seen with the naked eye if it is dim enough. Perpendicular to the first imaginary line away from Cassiopeia is a large block of stars. This is the Great Square of Pegasus, an asteroid belonging to Pegasus.

Another way to look at it is that if you use the three central stars of Cassiopeia as different arrows, the first constellation you will find is Cepheus. Beyond Cepheus is the Polaris of Ursa Minor. Looking further from Ursa Minor, you will see the Reef or the Big Dipper, which is part of Ursa Major.

In the third star jump from Cassiopeia, draw a line from the center star to the left star if it looks like the letter W, and from the right, if it looks like the letter M. If you continue, you will have three rows of stars. This is the top of Perseus.

Proceeding a little further in the same direction, you will see the Pleiades cluster, a small group of stars that look a bit like the Big Dipper. Once you find the Pleiades cluster, you are at the end of Taurus Perseus.

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